International Baccalaureate (IB) Phase 5

Reading
Writing
Oral Language
Visual Language

Written Language - Reading


Conceptual understandings:

  • Authors structure stories around significant themes.
  • Effective stories have a structure, purpose and sequence of events (plot) that help to make the author’s intention clear./li>
  • Synthesizing ideas and information from texts leads to new ideas and understanding.
  • Reading opens our minds to multiple perspectives and helps us to understand how people think, feel and act.

Learning Outcomes:

Related Ziptales Materials:

Learners:

  • read a wide range of texts confidently, independently and with understanding

Learners read selected Extending Literacy stories and/or Advanced Library stories then complete the comprehension activities at the end of each to demonstrate understanding of the text.

View the Specialised English Lessons Reading Module Reading Skills to improve reading strategies.


  • work in cooperative groups to locate and select texts appropriate to purpose and audience

Work collaboratively to complete Task 1 of the Specialised English Lessons Reading Module Refining Research Skills.


  • participate in class, group or individual author studies, gaining an in-depth understanding of the work and style of a particular author and appreciating what it means to be an author

Use the story The Real Mother of Harry Potter, Worksheets for the Comedy stories Getting Even (2) and Get Away (2) and the Family & Friends story Romeo and Juliet (1) to study different authors (Advanced Library).


  • identify genre (including fantasy, biography, science fiction, mystery, historical novel) and explain elements and literary forms that are associated with different genres

Explore the Extending Literacy Readling Library stories and Advanced Library genres (e.g. fantasy, mystery) to study the elements and literary forms of the different stories included in each genre.


  • appreciate structural and stylistic differences between fiction and non-fiction; show understanding of this distinction when structuring their own writing

Appreciate differences in fiction and non-fiction texts using Specialised English Lessons Reading Module Finding the Main Idea and Understanding Texts and use the distinctions to inform writing.


  • appreciate authors’ use of language and interpret meaning beyond the literal

View Specialised English Lessons Reading Module Interpreting Texts to help learners to develop an appreciation of an author’s use of language in a narrative text.


  • understand that authors use words and literary devices to evoke mental images

Use Specialised English Lessons Reading Module Using Emotive Language to explore words that authors use to evoke mental images.


  • recognize and understand figurative language, for example, similes, metaphors, idioms

Study Specialised English Lessons Reading Modules Figurative Language and What Are Idioms? to assist learners to recognize and understand figurative language.


  • make inferences and be able to justify them

Develop learners’ inferential comprehension skills using the Specialised English Lessons Reading Module Analysing Texts.


  • identify and describe elements of a story—plot, setting, characters, theme—and explain how they contribute to its effectiveness

  • compare and contrast the plots of two different but similar novels, commenting on effectiveness and impact

Practise comparing and contrasting the plots of similar Extending Literacy Stories e.g. The Flower of Happiness (Fairy Tales) and The Pearl Dragon (Myths and Legends); Blast Off! and Capsize! (both True Tales); A Laugh a Day and The New Girl (People)


  • distinguish between fact and opinion, and reach their own conclusions about what represents valid information

View the Skill Builders Comprehension module - Finding Facts to develop pre-requisite skills in distinguishing fact from opinion. Discuss the validity of opinions using Specialised English Lessons Reading Module Talking About Texts.


  • use a range of strategies to solve comprehension problems and deepen their understanding of a text

Study the Specialised English Lessons Reading Modules Reading Skills, Comprehension Strategies and Understanding Texts and the Comprehension modules in Skill Builders to explore reading comprehension strategies.

Use the multiple choice questions at the end of the Genre Stories and Advanced Library stories to provide an opportunity for learners to demonstrate their understanding of a text.


  • consistently and confidently use a range of resources to find information and support their inquiries

Use Specialised English Lessons Reading Module Refining Research Skills to guide learners to locate information to support their inquiries.


  • participate in collaborative learning, considering multiple perspectives and working with peers to co-construct new understanding

View the Specialised English Lessons Spoken Language Module Effective Group Work to reinforce effective collaborative learning behaviours.


  • use the internet responsibly and knowledgeably, appreciating its uses and limitations

Use information from the Specialised English Lessons Reading Module Refining Research Skills to build learners’ awareness of the limitations of the internet.


  • locate, organize and synthesize information from a variety of sources including the library/media centre, the internet, people in the school, family, the immediate community or the global community.

View Specialised English Lessons Reading Module Mapping Information to assist learners with organizing information.

Use the information and activity from the Specialised English Lessons Reading Module Refining Research Skills to assist learners with:

  • formulating focus questions
  • locating information
  • organizing and synthesizing key information

Consider the following Advanced Library worksheets as research task prompts: (All are Worksheet 2)

  • Mystery: Cell 13 - The Moon
  • Mystery: The Missing Angel - Donatello
  • People: The Stones - Gemstones
  • Comedy: Getting Even - Author Study
  • Horror: Trapped - Cave Diving
  • Adventure: Nightmare Island - Cyclones

Written Language - Writing


Conceptual understandings

  • Stories that people want to read are built around themes to which they can make connections.
  • Effective stories have a purpose and structure that help to make the author’s intention clear.
  • Synthesizing ideas enables us to build on what we know, reflect on different perspectives, and express new ideas.
  • Knowing what we aim to achieve helps us to plan and develop different forms of writing.
  • Through the process of planning, drafting, editing and revising, our writing improves over time.

Learning Outcomes:

Related Ziptales Materials:

Learners:

  • write independently and with confidence, showing the development of their own voice and style

Use Task 3 from the Specialised English Lessons Reading Module Identifying Narrative Voice and Aladdin Worksheet 2 & King Arthur Worksheet 1 (Graphic Classics) to provide opportunities for learners to develop their own voice and style.


  • write using a range of text types in order to communicate effectively, for example, narrative, instructional, persuasive

Study the structures and features of different text types using the Specialised English Lessons Writing Module What Are the Shapes of Texts?

Use the Write Time worksheets (via the blue icon link in Extending Literacy) to provide opportunities for learners to write arguments, essays, recounts, instructions, information and narratives.


  • adapt writing according to the audience and demonstrate the ability to engage and sustain the interest of the reader

Increase awareness of how to engage and sustain a reader’s interest by studying the Write Time digital documentary How to Write a Story.


  • use appropriate paragraphing to organize ideas

Study the Specialised English Lessons Writing Modules Separating Information in Texts & Topic Sentences and the Write Time digital documentary How to Write Essays to study the use of paragraphing in texts.


  • use a range of vocabulary and relevant supporting details to convey meaning and create atmosphere and mood

View Specialised English Lessons Writing Modules Features of Texts & Objective and Subjective Language to explore how to effectively use vocabulary to convey meaning.

Study the Specialised English Lessons Reading Modules Using Emotive Language, Interpreting Texts & Figurative Language to assist learners to use vocabulary to create atmosphere and mood.


  • use planning, drafting, editing and reviewing processes independently and with increasing competence

Use the Specialised English Lessons Writing Modules Creating Imaginative Texts, Information Report & Arguments and the Write Time digital documentaries to improve planning, drafting, editing and reviewing processes.


  • critique the writing of peers sensitively; offer constructive suggestions

View the Specialised English Lessons Spoken Language Module Talking About Feelings to explore how to use appropriate language to respond sensitively to others.


  • vary sentence structure and length

Use the Specialised English Lessons Writing Module How to Join Sentences and the Sentences module in the Grammar section of Skill Builders to develop awareness of how to vary sentence structure and length.


  • demonstrate an increasing understanding of how grammar works

Develop learners’ understanding of how grammar works using the Specialised English Lessons Writing Modules How to Join Sentences, What are Noun Phrases?, Adding Descriptors, What Time is it? (Tense) & Why Punctuate? and the Grammar modules and worksheets in Skill Builders.


  • use standard spelling for most words and use appropriate resources to check spelling

Learners study the Spelling modules in Skill Builders and complete associated worksheets to reinforce spelling skills.


  • use a dictionary, thesaurus, spellchecker confidently and effectively to check accuracy, broaden vocabulary and enrich their writing

Promote dictionary use by completing Task 3 of the Specialised English Lessons Writing Module Why is English Spelt so Strangely?


  • choose to publish written work in handwritten form or in digital format independently

View the Specialised English Lessons Writing Module Creating Imaginative Texts and allow learners to choose to publish the activity for Task 2 in digital format or handwritten form.


  • use written language as a means of reflecting on their own learning

Learners complete the tasks from the Specialised English Lessons Writing Module Digital Composition and write a reflective text about they thought of their final story film and what they learnt along the way.


  • recognize and use figurative language to enhance writing, for example, similes, metaphors, idioms, alliteration

Use the Specialised English Lessons Reading Module Figurative Language to study similes, metaphors and personification.

View the Specialised English Lessons Wrting Module More and Better Words and Specialised English Lessons Reading Module What Are Idioms? to study idioms and proverbs.

Study the Write Time digital documentary How to Write Poetry to explore alliteration.


  • identify and describe elements of a story—setting, plot, character, theme

Study the Specialised English Lessons Reading Module People Just Like Us and the Write Time digital documentaries Deconstructing a Story and How to Write a Story to explore the elements of a story.


  • locate, organize, synthesize and present written information obtained from a variety of valid sources

Use the Specialised English Lessons Reading Modules Refining Research Skills & Mapping Information and the Write Time digital documentary How to Write Information to develop skills in locating, organizing, synthesizing and presenting written information.


  • use a range of tools and techniques to produce written work that is attractively and effectively presented.

View the Specialised English Lessons Writing Module Digital Pictures and Publishing and use Tasks 1 & 2 to provide an opportunity for learners to produce written work attractively and effectively.



Oral Language - Listening and Speaking


Conceptual understandings

  • Spoken language can be used to persuade and influence people.
  • Metaphorical language creates strong visual images in our imagination.
  • Listeners identify key ideas in spoken language and synthesize them to create their own understanding.
  • People draw on what they already know in order to infer new meaning from what they hear.

Learning Outcomes:

Related Ziptales Materials:

Learners:

  • participate appropriately as listener and speaker, in discussions, conversations, debates and group presentations

Study Specialised English Lessons Spoken Language Modules Talking About Feelings and Asking Politely and use Graphic Classics worksheets The Happy Prince (1) & King Arthur (2) to develop listening and speaking skills in a variety of situations.


  • generate, develop and modify ideas and opinions through discussion

Work together to generate, develop and modify ideas and opinions by completing the Whodunit? and Amazing activities in Puzzle Palace.


  • listen and respond appropriately to instructions, questions and explanations

Complete Task 3 from the Specialised English Lessons Spoken Language Module Open and Closed Questions to practise responding appropriately to specific types of questions.


  • infer meanings, draw conclusions and make judgments about oral presentations

View the Graphic Classics oral presentations and complete the suggested activities to assist learners to:


  • use an increasing vocabulary and more complex sentence structures with a high level of specificity

Study the Specialised English Lessons Reading Modules Words Describing People and What Are Idioms? to assist learners to use an increasing vocabulary.

Use the Sentences module in Skill Builders to encourage learners to use complex sentences when speaking.


  • argue persuasively and justify a point of view

Equip learners with effective skills in arguing persuasively and justifying a point of view by viewing the Write Time digital documentary How to Write Arguments. Learners can work together to complete the associated worksheets.


  • show open-minded attitudes when listening to other points of view

View the Specialised English Lessons Spoken Language Module Effective Group Work to encourage learners to listen respectfully to others’ points of view.


  • paraphrase and summarize when communicating orally

Develop learners’ paraphrasing skills using the activities from Specialised English Lessons Spoken Language Module Listening Well.


  • understand and use figurative language such as simile, personification and metaphor

View the Specialised English Lessons Reading Module Figurative Language to study similes, personification and metaphor.


  • use oral language to formulate and communicate possibilities and theories

Use the tasks from Specialised English Lessons Spoken Language Module Effective Group Work to provide an opportunity for learners to use oral language to communicate possibilities.


  • use standard grammatical structures competently in appropriate situations

View the Grammar modules in Skill Builders to assist learners with using standard grammatical structures competently.


  • use register, tone, voice level and intonation to enhance meaning

Use the Teacher Strategies for the Rhyme Time poems to explore how to use register, tone, voice level and intonation to enhance meaning when reciting poetry.


  • appreciate that people speak and respond according to personal and cultural perspectives

Study Specialised English Lessons Spoken Language Module Who Are We Talking To? to develop an appreciation for the different ways of speaking according to personal perspectives.


  • use speech responsibly to inform, entertain and influence others

Complete Task 2 of Specialised English Lessons Spoken Language Module Speaking to an Audience changing the instructions to specify the nationality of the learners.


  • reflect on communication to monitor and assess their own learning.

Use the Make and Do instructional texts to provide opportunities for learners to reflect on how well they listened to the instructions by discussing with others the quality of the item they produce.



Visual Language - Viewing and Presenting


Conceptual understandings

  • The aim of commercial media is to influence and persuade viewers.
  • Individuals respond differently to visual texts, according to their previous experiences, preferences and perspectives.
  • Knowing about the techniques used in visual texts helps us to interpret presentations and create our own visual effects.
  • Synthesizing information from visual texts is dependent upon personal interpretation and leads to new understanding.

Learning Outcomes:

Related Ziptales Materials:

Learners:

  • view and critically analyse a range of visual texts, communicating understanding through oral, written and visual media

View the Specialised English Lessons Reading Module Film Language A and the Visual Literacy module in the Comprehension section of Skill Builders to promote awareness of the critical analysis of visual texts.


  • identify factors that influence personal reactions to visual texts; design visual texts with the intention of influencing the way people think and feel

Study the Specialised English Lessons Reading Module What Do Layouts Say to Us? to assist learners with identifying factors that influence personal reactions to visual texts.


  • analyse and interpret the ways in which visual effects are used to establish context

Use the Graphic Classics worksheets for The Happy Prince (3) and King Arthur (4) to provide an opportunity for learners to interpret and analyse the ways in which visual effects are used to establish context.


  • identify elements and techniques that make advertisements, logos and symbols effective and draw on this knowledge to create their own visual effects

Learners work together to explore aspects of design as outlined in Worksheet 2 for the Graphic Classic story King Arthur.


  • realize that cultural influences affect the way we respond to visual effects and explain how this affects our interpretation, for example, the use of particular colours or symbols

Learners view the Advanced Library story Superstitions (Information genre) and complete Worksheet 2 to explore how visual effects (such as colours and symbols) can be interpreted in different ways depending on cultural influences.


  • realize that individuals interpret visual information according to their personal experiences and different perspectives

Use the Specialised English Lessons Reading Module People Just Like Us to identify how personal experiences can affect interpretation of a text, then study the images used in selected Ziptales stories to discuss how they can be viewed from different perspectives e.g. Amy’s face on page 2 of the Advanced Library story The Best of Both Worlds (Family and Friends genre).


  • show how body language, for example, facial expression, gesture and movement, posture and orientation, eye contact and touch, can be used to achieve effects and influence meaning

View the Advanced Library story Body Language (Information genre) to explore how body language can be used to achieve effects and influence meaning.


  • apply knowledge of presentation techniques in original and innovative ways; explain their own ideas for achieving desired effects

Use Specialised English Lessons Writing Module Digital Composition to improve knowledge of presentation techniques.


  • examine and analyse text and illustrations in reference material, including online text, explaining how visual and written information work together to reinforce each other and make meaning more explicit

View the Specialised English Lessons Reading Module What Do Pictures Say? (Part B) to explore how visual and written information work together to reinforce each other and make meaning more explicit.


  • navigate the internet in response to verbal and visual prompts with confidence and familiarity; use ICT to prepare their own presentations

Study Specialised English Lessons Writing Module Digital Pictures and Publishing to guide learners in using ICT to publish their own presentations.


  • use appropriate terminology to identify a range of visual effects/formats and critically analyse their effectiveness, for example, mood, media, juxtaposition, proportion

View the Specialised English Lessons Reading Module The Grammar of Film and TV to explore some examples of the terminology used for visual texts.


  • analyse the selection and composition of visual presentations; select examples to explain how they achieve a particular impact, for example, dominant images, use of colour, texture, symbolism

Analyse the selection and composition of the Graphic Classics identifying examples of images that achieve a particular impact e.g. the dominant use of the golden statue in The Happy Prince; the use of colour and symbols when Arthur pulls the sword out of the stone in King Arthur.


  • identify the intended audience and purpose of a visual presentation; identify overt and subliminal messages

Study overt and subliminal messages in print advertisements by viewing the ‘How do you read an ad’ section of the Visual Literacy Module in the Comprehension section of Skill Builders and then completing Worksheet 1.


  • reflect on ways in which understanding the intention of a visual message can influence personal responses.

Provide opportunities for learners to personally respond to visual messages using Graphic Classics worksheets for The Happy Prince (4) and King Arthur (3).



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